Physical

What is a "healthy diet"?

The word diet has a bad reputation, businesses tend to use it to describe restrictive, and often bonkers ways of eating in order to lose weight. But really, the definition of a diet is a picture of the foods that we habitually eat.

Sam Pashley

December 16, 2021

The word diet has a bad reputation, businesses tend to use it to describe restrictive, and often bonkers ways of eating in order to lose weight. But really, the definition of a diet is a picture of the foods that we habitually eat.

So how can we ensure that our diet is healthy, and what are the benefits?

Firstly, food quantity. There’s a lot to be said about this, as the amount of food we eat has the biggest influence on our weight management as well as our energy levels to exercise well and perform throughout the day. Too little food and we’ll most likely feel overly hungry, have cravings and will experience energy dips throughout the day. Too much and we might feel sluggish, lethargic and experience similar low energy symptoms. The key here is to manage your food intake appropriately for your health and fitness goals and bring some awareness to your eating habits.

Secondly, protein. Proteins aren’t just the building blocks of muscle, they’re also important for all tissues, for our hormonal make up and for keeping a healthy immune system. When it comes to keeping you fuller for longer, this is the macronutrient you need. Aim to get a good source of protein at each meal to cover your bases.

Next up, veg! I know… It’s not exactly breaking news that vegetables are good for us. But they are. Get a wide variety of fibrous veggies in your diet and your body will thank you in many ways. It’ll stay fuller for longer, meaning that you’ll be happier and healthier in the long run.

Lastly, you might come across diets telling you to completely remove either carbs or fats. Yes, these might provide a short term strategy and make it more likely that you’ll eat less (you’ve just taken out a whole load of foods that you’re not allowed to eat), but this is a short term strategy. Ask yourself, do you think the secret to long term nutritional success comes from learning to include the foods you like and an overall balance, or overly restricting yourself and trying to pretend certain food groups don’t exist?